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Day of the Dead @ City of Raleigh Museum

Day-of-the-Dead-@ The City of Raleigh Museum

ARTIST STUDIO PROJECT IN COLLABORATION WITH THE CITY OF RALEIGH MUSEUM INVITE YOU TO:

DAY OF THE DEAD @ CITY OF RALEIGH MUSEUM – DOWNTOWN RALEIGH NC.

FIRST FRIDAY NOVEMBER 2, 2018 6-9 PM
220 FAYETTEVILLE ST. RALEIGH, NC 27601

JOIN US FOR FOLKLORIC MUSIC, FACE PAINTING, CRAFTS, DAY OF THE DEAD BREAD, HOT CHOCOLATE AND TRADITIONAL DRESS!

Special thanks to: Baile Folklorico Vicky Academy, Larry Bellorín and Agustin Gonzalez, Lety Alvarez, Cornelio Campos, Panaderia Y Pasteleria Pahuatlan of Raleigh, Quirkworks Entertainment and Explosion 106.7 FM.

There will also be more than a dozen members of the community dressed in traditional dress and painted so feel free to bring your cameras.


Thank you / Gracias a EB Photography y Revista Latina NC


 

   

We would love for you to also come dressed for the DAY OF THE DEAD.

Here are some tips:

Yellow & Orange | Represent the sun, light, and life. These colors are most commonly seen in the marigolds found everywhere during Día de los Muertos.
Pink | Represents the happiness and celebration associated with Día de los Muertos.
Red | Represents blood, appropriately.
Purple | Represents pain, suffering, grief, and mourning and to use this color is to acknowledge the loss of loved ones.
White | Represents purity, hope, and renewal of the spirit after death.
Black | Represents death, but more so, the land of the dead.

 

HOW TO DRESS FOR DAY OF THE DEAD // WOMEN

  • Dress – Flowered print or simple Black, Red, Dark Blue, Purple, or White
  • Big, chunky necklaces
  • Flower pins – red roses, marigolds
  • A shawl – helps when the temperature drops
  • Comfortable shoes
  • Big floppy hat, à la Catrina herself
  • A lacy veil
  • And most importantly, a flower crown

 

HOW TO DRESS FOR DAY OF THE DEAD // MEN

Day of the Dead is easier for men. Chances are, you already have most of this stuff you need.

  • Dress shirt and pants
  • Suspenders
  • Tie
  • Hat
  • A cane
  • Skeleton gloves

The Day of the Dead (Spanish: Día de Muertos) is a celebration that started in Mesoamerica (an area that covers Central Mexico to Costa Rica) about 3,000 years ago. Different cultures including Aztec, Maya and Toltec, celebrated the life of their loved ones, they used to have a celebration for the infants or children that had deceased and another one for the adults. These celebrations usually coincided with the migration of the Monarch Butterflies which some cultures associate with spirits returning home. When the Spaniards arrived they fused their catholic celebrations with the indigenous rituals celebrating two Spanish holidays: All Saints Day (Nov. 1) and All Soul’s Day (Nov. 2). Día de Muertos is often celebrated on November 1st as a day to remember children who have passed away, and on Nov. 2 to honor adults.
In 2008, the tradition was inscribed in the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.

Although Day of The Dead is mostly considered a Mexican Holiday it is celebrated in one form or another in many countries to include: Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Puerto Rico, Peru, El Salvador, Venezuela and many others.